Consumer Electronics Show offers high-tech health and wellness

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The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) is the world’s largest annual consumer technology trade show, featuring about 4,500 exhibitors showing off their latest products and services to an expected 170,000 attendees. With technology aimed at a variety of lifestyles and activities, here’s a look at technology developed to keep you healthy.

Meditation headband

Below, Ge Zheng demonstrates the Flowtime, a meditation biosensing headband by Entertech. The device claims to provide more insight into your meditation practice by tracking your brainwaves and heart rate.

(David Becker/Getty Images)

Health watch

A ScanWatch is displayed in the Withings booth. The health tracker-smartwatch hybrid, which says is can take an ECG reading and monitor for potential sleep apnea, will be available in the spring. 

(David Becker/Getty Images)

Virtual reality trainer

Samsung’s virtual reality trainer GEMS (Gait Enhancing and Motivation System) uses robotics to provide increasingly difficult workouts.

(David Becker/Getty Images)

Cycling helmet

Robert Keating models a Safe-Tec smart cycling helmet with built-in Alexa. The helmet has headphones in the main body, and dual microphones and controls embedded into the chin strap. The helmet comes with lights at the front and is designed to give cyclists easy, hands-free access to their media.

(Steve Marcus/Reuters)

Intelligent toilet

The Kohler Numi 2.0 advanced intelligent toilet offers water efficiency, personalized cleansing and dryer functions, heated seat and built-in speakers. It also offers dynamic multicoloured ambient lighting and audio enhancements. Amazon Alexa is built in so you can shop or listen to music. 

(Ross D. Franklin/The Associated Press)

Diaper monitor

The Pampers Lumi connected diaper connects to a wide-angle camera equipped with night-vision and two-way audio. It also tracks room temperature and humidity.

(John Locher/The Associated Press)

Skin-care analysis mirror

A woman tries out the Lumini Home skin-care analysis mirror. Lululab says its “beauty and lifestyle assistant” uses AI and data intelligence to learn and adapt to owners’ skin-care needs, offering solutions and product recommendations.

(John Locher/The Associated Press)

Beauty wand

The Procter & Gamble Opte beauty wand promises to restore skin by detecting and covering age spots or other imperfections without using lasers.

(John Locher/The Associated Press)

Rolling robot

Hyun-Suk Kim, president and CEO of the consumer electronics division at Samsung, demonstrates Ballie, a personal assistant that follows you around the house and can perform a variety of functions. The company says Ballie will not share data with third-party companies without users’ consent.

(John Locher/The Associated Press)

Smart glove

The Neofect Smart Glove is a stroke rehabilitation device that allows users to develop training goals, play rehab “games,” and measure progress via the app. 

(John Locher/The Associated Press)

Pet monitor 

Sure Petcare’s Animo attaches to your dog’s collar to monitor his activity and behaviour through functions like counting calories and logging sleep habits.

(David Becker/Getty Images)

Therapy robot

Saaya Okuda of Yukai Engineering holds a Qoobo therapy robot, a cushion with a tail that “waves gently” or “swings playfully” or “wags just to say hello.”

(Steve Marcus/Reuters)

Educational robots

Two-legged Roybi educational robots teach children aged 3-7 about colours, animals and shapes. The robots also recognize faces and individual users.  

(David Becker/Getty Images)

Companion robots

Lovot companion robots by Groove X have an antenna that recognizes surroundings, a thermal camera that distinguishes humans from objects, touch sensors, and wheels that retract when they are picked up. 

(Steve Marcus/Reuters

CES continues through Jan. 10 in Las Vegas. 

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